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Daishichi Theme Park

| Daishichi Theme Park | The definitive kimoto brewing compendium | Super-flat Rice Polishing Technique |
| Sake brewery tour | Next-generation bottling line |

Sake brewery tour

Steaming the rice

Immediately after polishing, the rice is warm from friction. It therefore spends between 14 and 20 days in the storage facility to gradually cool and stabilise. After that, only the amount that is to be used immediately is taken, washed to remove any bran, then soaked in sufficient water and finally steam-cooked. Unlike when cooking rice at home, the rice and water are not put into the same container. Steam is built up in the lower pan, called a wagama, after which the rice in the container above, called a koshiki, is steamed. Steaming leaves the rice starch more susceptible to being broken down by the koji enzymes.


Daishichi only uses wagama, because they steam at very high heat. The new buildings do not contain any continuous rice steaming machines. In order to fully exploit the traditional cast metal sanshu pot, furnaces and an enormous chimney of firebricks has been built for the two large cauldrons. The steaming of the rice begins the sake-brewing process and is the most important step.


The steaming process


FAQ

DAISHICHI SAKE BREWERY CO., LTD.
1-66 Takeda, Nihonmatsu,
Fukushima 964-0902, JAPAN
FAX +81 243-23-0008
E-mail:info@daishichi.com

We welcome your inquiries in either English or Japanese.